Goldex

A Few Words About Me

Exhibitions and awards

Search...

>

I am born in 1954 and have been making tapestries since 1977. The tapestries are woven on a large handmade loom. Before I can start weaving a new tapestry, I am making a lot of different sketches. When I am satisfied with the final sketch, I enlarge it, so that it fits behind the loom. Now the real work begins. Where the painter would be done now, I start my work.

It normally takes about ½ a year to finish a tapestry – of course depending on the size.

I have always been fascinated by the miracle that one fine thread can be turned into a solid picture. I have therefore found a special way to weave by, so that I can make the best out of the colours.

My technique is time demanding, but gives me the possibility to obtain nuances sliding into another. The sensuality of the surface is very important to me. The surface of the tapestry must appeal strongly to the senses.

FINE ART TAPESTRY ARTIST

Anne Marie Nygaard Eilertsen

Copyright Anne-Marie Nygaard Eilertsen, All rights reserved

I can only see 30 – 40 cm of the tapestry at a time, so it is always a magic moment when I cut off the tapestry from the loom, roll it out and see it for the very first time as a whole.

Presently I am working with the theme “El lobo interior”, autobiographic weavings which are colourful, symbolic and surrealistic. Pictures made in a critical period of my life. Even though the motives may be challenging and painful, the aesthetics are very important to me. Life can be a bitch – and I choose to describe it in a way which is both harmonic and awful. Each picture is an allegory where every piece can be interpreted.

Before “El lobo interior” my theme was “the Spanish Corrida”. Here I was focusing on the movement, the choreography. Fascinated by the fusion of art and tragedy, the raw and the delicate, the joint dance of death.

In 1995 I received a scholarship (Toyota), for studying sumowrestlers in the Akibasho-tournament (Tokyo) and afterwards I made tapestries of them.

My description here concentrates on the contrasts of Sumo: The coolness of the rituals versus the explosion of power in the bout. Huge, heavy bodies versus their elasticity and rapidity. Swelling forms versus the deep shadow of soft folds.

Earlier on my motives were about the human body and before that nature versus culture. I don’t decide on when to change the theme of my pictures. It more or less “comes to me”, when I am ready.